Election Tools

We hope these tools help you out in running your next election. If you do not have word processing or spreadsheet software, you can use Libre Office or Open Office for free. If you've found this resource valuable, please tell others and consider a donation. Additionally, we do not offer resources for plurality elections because it is an awful voting method and should never be used.

Ballot Templates

Approval Voting

File Approval Voting, 6 choices, 3x5 card.odt

File Approval Voting, 13 choices, half-US-Letter.odt_half-us-letter.odt

File Approval Voting, 20 choices, US-Letter.odt

Score Voting

File Score Voting, 0-5 scale, 12 choices, US Letter.odt

Score Voting, 0-5 scale, 16 choices, US Letter.odt

File Score Voting, 0-9 scale, 16 choices, US-Letter.odt

Note: Index cards fit the smaller dimensions and make great ballots.
Optional: You can add a none-of-the-above option if you are prepared to offer your voters another election with new candidates.

Online Elections & Polling with Google Docs

Please copy this form onto your own Google Drive:

(Waiting until Google Forms permits read only templates...)

Tabulation

File Score-Approval Voting Tabulation Spreadsheet.xlsx

(Single-winner or adaptable to bloc methods)

Miscellaneous

File Voter Roster.odt

File Ballot Write-in List.odt

Language Usage

By-law language

Approval Voting Default With Score Voting Option

ARTICLE 3. VOTING
SECTION 1. VOTING METHOD

When there are only two options, voters may choose only one option unless another voting method is determined by the board.

When there are more than two options, the default voting method of the board is approval voting where each voter may choose as many options as desired. The winning option is the one chosen by the most voters.

By majority vote, the board may choose to use score voting using either a 0-5 scale or 0-9 scale rating all the options. The option with the highest rating wins.

State Legislation Language

AN ACT enabling municipalities to adopt approval voting.

Be it Enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened:
 
1  New Section; Powers and Duties of Towns; Approval Voting Authorized.  Amend by inserting:
Approval Voting Authorized.  Absent a contrary law, a town may by ordinance establish and use approval voting in the town's primary or general election.  An approval voting system provides for the following:
I.  A voter in the election may vote for as many candidates for a single office as the voter chooses to approve.
II.  The candidate with the highest number of votes within a primary becomes the party nominee. The candidate with the highest number of votes within a general election is elected. For referendum items, the option with the highest number of votes is enacted.
III.  The ballot and all other voting materials must clearly state that the voter may vote for as many candidates in that election as he or she chooses. For example: "Vote for one Or More".
2  Effective Date.  This act will take effect 60 days after its passage.
 

 

AN ACT requiring municipalities to adopt approval voting.

Be it Enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives in General Court convened:
 
1  New Section; Powers and Duties of Towns; Approval Voting Requirement.  Amend by inserting:
Approval Voting Requirement.  Absent a contrary law, all municipalities must use approval voting for all its elections.  An approval voting system provides for the following:
I.  A voter in the election may vote for as many candidates for a single office as the voter chooses to approve.
II.  The candidate with the highest number of votes within a primary becomes the party nominee. The candidate with the highest number of votes within a general election is elected. For referendum items, the option with the highest number of votes is enacted.
III.  The ballot and all other voting materials must clearly state that the voter may vote for as many candidates in that election as he or she chooses. For example: "Vote for one Or More".
2  Effective Date.  This act will take effect 60 days after its passage.
 
 
 
Topic: 

Follow The Center for Election Science on: